Unit 4: Video Story Assignment

Purpose:

The purpose of this project is to create a 90 second-4 minute digital video narrative. You will develop skills in gathering and editing original video your story.

The first step in this project will be to gather original video and still footage about your topic. You may find the Skype recording tools useful. You may interview yourself as well. Please post the raw video footage of at least 2 different scenes to your blog by 5pm on Friday, November 18th (15 points).

Next, create a script/storyboard in a word processing program (e.g. MS Word) that outlines how your story will flow. Be sure to include information about the visual shots, the audio that accompanies it, and transitions between different clips. Using Adobe Premiere, edit your video and audio footage to create a digital narrative or story about your topic. You have the creative freedom to develop this story as you would like. You may choose to narrate the story yourself with a written voiceover. Please post a draft of your script/storyboard, edited digital video story, and write-up to your blog by Thursday, December 1st at 5pm (50 points). (See rubric for digital video story and write-up below).

Over the following weekend, please post constructive feedback to your group members’ (20 points). Please have your feedback posted by Monday, December 5th at 5pm.

Using the feedback from your group members, and self-critique, please post your updated video story, script, and write-up by 10am on Wednesday, December 14th (150 points, rubric below).

Final Project Grading Rubric (150 Points):

Multimedia Video Story (90 points):

1. Creativity in Video Composition – 25 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Primarily remains within conventional or safe parameters of thinking and ideas. Minimal exploration or experimentation. Explores multiple ideas or approaches, with some flexibility and experimentation / risk taking. Generates many ideas, exploring inventive & divergent thinking. Demonstrates flexibility and openness, new combinations and experimentation.
Comments:
2. Content – 25 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Video story identifies and communicates the topic/issue with limited success; some basic aspects may be incomplete or confused. Video story identifies and focuses on the topic/issue. Communicates narrative about the topic/issue it is designed for. Video content clearly and effectively communicates a narrative about the topic/issue it is designed for.
Comments:
4. Design principles – 20 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
The video story is difficult to follow. There is little or no evidence of a storyline. Adequately demonstrates understanding of video story design. Narrative is generally relevant and flows with overall story. Audio and visual storytelling elements are mostly cohesive. May be lacking some depth. Demonstrates strong understanding of video story design. Narrative is clear and is very easy to follow. Audio and visual elements are very cohesive. Demonstrates strong story planning.
Comments:
5. Technical Proficiency – 20 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Visual and audio elements do not blend smoothly. Gaps exist in narrative. Transitions awkward or empty. Visual and audio elements are consistent through most of the narrative. Transitions are mostly smooth with some obvious edits. Visual and audio elements are consistent throughout the narrative.  Edits are smooth and undetectable. No empty spaces in the story.
Comments:

Script (20 points):

Script – 20 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Script includes some of the video and audio elements of the project, but final video project is very different from what is outlined here. Script includes most of the video and audio elements of the story, but the final project contains many elements not present. Script fully fleshes out video and audio content including transitions.
Comments:

Write-Up (40 points):

Creativity in writing – 10 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Minimal or absent explanation or exploration in description of the multimedia narrative process. Explores design process with some flexibility. Length is acceptable and clearly communicates topic. Generates many ideas in exploring the process of creating the multimedia narrative. Thoughtful and insightful to story creation.
Comments:
Relates to topic/issue – 10 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Absent or minimal explanation of how multimedia elements in relate to topic/issue narrative. Little explanation of design elements’ meaning. Adequate explanation of how multimedia elements relate to topic/issue. Some elements inclusion may be unclear, but overall theme is understandable. Strong explanation of how multimedia elements in relate to topic/issue. All elements in narrative are thoroughly explored and explained.
Comments:
Diverse Perspectives – 10 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Multimedia narrative explanation is largely discussed with little consideration or inappropriate for Internet audience. Multimedia narrative explanation includes some original thinking and acknowledges or relates to multiple viewpoints. Adequately written for wide Internet audience. Multimedia narrative explanation includes accurate, nuanced, and respectful thinking. Acknowledges and relates to multiple viewpoints. Easily accessible for wide Internet audience.
Comments:
Technical Detail – 10 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Absent or incoherent explanation of how multimedia editing was executed using software tools. Adequate explanation of how multimedia editing was executed using software tools. Some elements may be missing or unclear, but gives an overall understanding of software tools utilized to create narrative. Strong explanation of how multimedia editing was executed using software tools. It is very clear how the narrative was created and how multimedia elements were manipulated to create the final narrative.
Comments:

 

Class Survey #3: Audio Unit Feedback

I have posted a third feedback survey. I am interested in your opinions about the Audio Production Unit and the class overall so far. Please spend a couple moments to take the anonymous, short survey.

Unit 4: More Video Notes

Script/Storyboard

Before you begin editing your draft video project, be sure to create a draft script, or storyboard. You should create a word document with two columns. In the left column, you should have information about the video. You can also put in still frames of the actual video shots if you’d like, but I am not requiring it. You should describe the content of the video frame (what is being displayed) and the type of shot (medium shot/close up). On the right hand side of the column, you should put in Audio information. That is, what is the person talking about? I expect the blog post with your draft video project to be accompanied by your draft script. See these three sites for storyboard information: 1 2 3

Shots

When shooting video, it is best to edit between steady camera shots, rather than zooming and panning in the shot. Follow the 5-shot rule to create a visually interesting video sequence.

Example Videos

We watched and discussed example digital video narratives in class including Common Ground, Home Movies and Learning to Ride from the Center for Digital Storytelling.

Week 13: Video Title Sequence Tutorial

Now that we’ve learned the basics of editing in Adobe Premiere, you will create an advanced title animation in this week’s tutorial. You may work on this at home on your computer or in the labs. Before you start working, please read all the way through the tutorial and watch the example video.

1. Create a new Adobe Premiere Project. Shoot and import a 30-second video of a single shot with some motion to your background. For example, you might shoot a tree blowing in the wind. You could try to find some footage that relates to your topic and make this tutorial part of your video project.

2. Create a graphic in photoshop with at least 4 different layers of text with title information for your project. You will individually animate each of these layers (see video below). Save the file as a .psd.

3. Import the psd file as individual layers into Premiere.

4. Animate each of the layers separately and make them appear in your title sequence.

5. After you are happy with your title sequence, export the video and upload it to Youtube. Also, export your title PSD file to a JPG and post it in the same blog entry. Post the video tutorial to your blog.

For details on importing the PSD file and animating the layers as a title sequence, see:

http://tv.adobe.com/watch/digital-video/getting-started-10-inserting-graphics/

Week 12: In-Class Premiere Tutorial

Last week we worked on the basics of video editing in Adobe Premiere. As a reference, here is a reference to the various tools we used.

1. Import files from the Z:\COM499\WSU Experience\ by dragging the two videos, image, and audio file into your project window in the top-left of Premiere. Alternatively, you can go to file->import and find the files.

2. Create and edit subclips. Drag one of the videos into the source viewer in the top-center. You can then set “in” and “out” points in the source viewer to create subclips, or drag the cropped clips into your sequence timeline in the bottom-center. We discussed various ways to create and edit subclips, as well as putting them in Bins. The final project should have a sequence from the WSU experience video (without an interview clip), followed by a football sequence, followed by a second WSU experience clip, followed by a second football sequence. Be sure to resize the clips so the fit in the sequence frame. Tools: Select Tool, Ripple Edit Tool, Slip Tool, Slide Tool, Razor Tool, Subclips, Bins. For reference, see:

Subclips & Bins: http://layersmagazine.com/using-subclips-in-premiere-pro.html
Edit tools: http://layersmagazine.com/clip-trimming-in-premiere-pro.html

3. Transitions. We covered various transition effects between subclips in your sequence. We added a cross-dissolve between your first two clips, and a “fade to black” at the end of the sequence. For reference, see:

http://layersmagazine.com/creating-transitions-in-premiere-pro.html

4. Adding text. We covered various ways to add text to your video, including still text, crawling text (from left to right), rolling text (from the bottom to top), and a still slide based on a template. We added a still, centered text sequence at the beginning of the video followed by a crawling text after a touchdown play in the first football subclip, followed by rolling text as credits at the end of the sequence and lastly, a still slide from a template thanking the viewer for watching the video. For reference, see:

http://layersmagazine.com/premiere-pro-text-rolls-and-crawls.html
http://tv.adobe.com/watch/digital-video/getting-started-11-adding-titles/

5. Panning graphics. Next, we inserted the still image of the bronze cougar at the end of the last football clip, before the credits. After inserting the image into the video, resize the image to it fits in the frame. We then animated a slight upward pan and zoom using keyframes at the beginning and end of the image. For reference, see:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jfy-4hAnDFs

6. Adjusting audio. We unlinked the audio from the original videos and deleted those audio tracks. Then, we imported the music clip from the Z:\ drive. We added keyframes at the beginning and about 5 seconds into the video and faded the music up. We trimmed the music file down to match the length of the video and added two more key frames at the end of the video to fade out the music. We also discussed the “normalize audio” tool. For reference, see:

Adjusting audio: http://tv.adobe.com/watch/digital-video/getting-started-12-adding-and-adjusting-audio/
Normalizing audio: http://tv.adobe.com/watch/digital-video/normalizing-audio-for-the-whole-master-track/

7. Export video. Once we finished with the video, we exported the video to a 720p H.264 file. After the file was encoded with Adobe Media Encoder, we logged into Youtube.com and uploaded the video (be sure it is set to either public or unlisted so you can link it to your blog). Once the video is finished, you can paste the youtube.com link into your blog to embed the video. I have posted my example video below. You should post your in-class tutorial to your blog.

For exporting reference, see:

http://tv.adobe.com/watch/digital-video/getting-started-13-exporting-your-project/

Note: Be sure your video includes 4 different video subclips, 1 image, title from template, still centered text, crawling text, rolling text, at least 2 transitions between clips, panning and zooming effect on image, audio with fade in and fade out.

Example Video:

 

Academic Media Services

You should be able to check out a DV camera from Academic Media Services, located at 150 Holland Library.

Keep in mind checkouts are due back the next day at 1pm. Checkout is free for class projects.

COM499 Survey #2: Your Feedback

I have posted a second survey. I am interested in your feedback about the Illustration Unit and the class so far. Please spend a couple moments to take the anonymous, short survey.

Unit 3: Audio Story Assignment

Purpose:

The purpose of this project is to turn in an 4-7 minute audio narrative or audio collage about your topic. You will develop skills in gathering original audio through interviews and ambient sound recording to use in your story.

The first step in this project will be to gather original interviews and other footage about your topic. You may find the Skype recording tools useful. You may interview yourself as well. Please post the raw audio of at least 2 interviews to your blog by 5pm on Tuesday, October 18th (15 points).

Next, using Adobe Audition, edit together clips of your audio interviews and footage to create an audio narrative or story about your topic. You have the creative freedom to develop this story as a narrative or collage. You may choose to narrate the story yourself with a written voiceover. Please post a draft of your edited audio story and write-up to your blog by Monday, October 24th at 5pm (50 points). (See rubric for audio story and write-up below).

Over the weekend, please post constructive feedback to your group members’ (20 points). Please have your feedback posted by Wednesday, October 26th at 5pm.

Using the feedback from your group members, and self-critique, please post your updated audio story and write-up by 5pm on Tuesday, November 1st (125 points, rubric below).

Useful links:

Transom.org (audio recording and editing tips)
Ira Glass on Transom (another interview about creating audio stories)

This American Life (Great audio stories on a variety of topics using narrative, collage, and journalistic approaches. A couple of my early favorites include Episodes 58 [we listened in class] & 80. You can view a list of other favorites here.)

This I Believe (excellent archive of audio essays)

Final Project Grading Rubric: 

Audio Story (75 points):

1. Creativity in Audio Composition – 25 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Primarily remains within conventional or safe parameters of thinking and ideas. Minimal exploration or experimentation. Explores multiple ideas or approaches, with some flexibility and experimentation / risk taking. Generates many ideas, exploring inventive & divergent thinking. Demonstrates flexibility and openness, new combinations and experimentation.
Comments:
2. Content – 20 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Audio story identifies and communicates the topic/issue with limited success; some basic aspects may be incomplete or confused. Audio story identifies and focuses on the topic/issue. Communicates narrative about the topic/issue it is designed for. Audio content clearly and effectively communicates a narrative about the topic/issue it is designed for.
Comments:
3. Design principles – 15 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
The audio story is difficult to follow. There is little or no evidence of a storyline. Adequately demonstrates understanding of audio story design. Narrative is generally relevant and flows with overall story. May be lacking some depth. Demonstrates strong understanding of audio story design. Narrative is clear and is very easy to follow. Demonstrates strong story planning.
Comments:
4. Technical Proficiency – 15 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Audio does not blend smoothly. Gaps exist in narrative and other audio elements. Transitions awkward or empty. Audio is consistent through most of the narrative. Transitions are mostly smooth with some obvious edits. Audio is consistent throughout the narrative.  Edits are smooth and undetectable. No empty spaces in the story.
Comments:

Write-Up (50 points):

1. Creativity in writing – 10 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Minimal or absent explanation or exploration in description of the audio narrative process. Explores design process with some flexibility. Length is acceptable and clearly communicates topic. Generates many ideas in exploring the process of creating the audio narrative. Thoughtful and insightful to story creation.
Comments:
2. Relates to topic/issue – 15 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Absent or minimal explanation of how audio elements in relate to topic/issue narrative. Little explanation of design elements’ meaning. Adequate explanation of how audio elements relate to topic/issue. Some elements inclusion may be unclear, but overall theme is understandable. Strong explanation of how audio elements in relate to topic/issue. All elements in narrative are thoroughly explored and explained.
Comments:
3. Diverse Perspectives – 10 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Audio narrative explanation is largely discussed with little consideration or inappropriate for Internet audience. Audio narrative explanation includes some original thinking and acknowledges or relates to multiple viewpoints. Adequately written for wide Internet audience. Audio narrative explanation includes accurate, nuanced, and respectful thinking. Acknowledges and relates to multiple viewpoints. Easily accessible for wide Internet audience.
Comments:
4. Technical Detail – 15 points
1-Minimal 2-Emerging 3-Developing 4-Competent 5-Effective 6-Publishable
Absent or incoherent explanation of how audio editing was executed using software tools. Adequate explanation of how audio editing was executed using software tools. Some elements may be missing or unclear, but gives an overall understanding of software tools utilized to create narrative. Strong explanation of how audio editing was executed using software tools. It is very clear how the narrative was created and how audio elements were manipulated to create the final narrative.
Comments:

Unit 3: Audio Tutorials

We have gone over two tutorials together in class:

Tutorial 1
Counting

In the first tutorial, we recorded ourselves saying the numbers 1-10 out of order (e.g., 4, 2, 6, 5, 1, 8, 7, 9, 3, 10).

Using Adobe Audition, use the “selection tool” located in the top toolbar to highlight individual numbers and cut and paste them back in order in the multitrack editing window (this post will be updated with screenshots soon).

Music Bed

Next, we will add a “music bed” underneath our counting. First, drag a music file into an unused track in Audition’s multi-track view. Select a track you think would work well underneath talking (you can use the example file “ascona” as well). Once this music file is in a new track, you’ll want to crop it so it is about 10 second longer than the time it takes you to count from 1-10. Select the audio from the “counting” track using the “move tool” and drag it so it is centered in between the music file. That is, there should be about 5 seconds of music before you start counting, and 5 seconds of music after you finish counting.

Next, you’ll want to move your mouse using the select tool to the yellow “envelope” line about 3/4s of the way up on the music track. When you hover your mouse over the envelope line, you should see the word “Volume” appear. Next, click on the yellow line about 1 second before you start counting. This will create a volume automation point on the music file. Click the yellow line again about 1 second after you have started counting. Drag the second volume automation point you created down to lower the volume of the music underneath your voice. You can start at a level of -8dB. Now, try playing the volume level adjustments to get the music volume sounding appropriate underneath your count. The music should fade to the background. It should be audible, but not loud enough to distract from hearing the numbers clearly.

Repeat this process at the end of your count. About one second before you finish counting create a volume automation point and a second point about a second after you finish counting. Drag the second point up to 0dB, so the music is again playing at full volume.

We’re almost done! When you have your music track selected, you should see a small square to the top left and top right of the track. When you click on the square in the top left and drag to the right, it will automatically create a “fade in” effect. That is, the music will start silently, then come up to 0dB. Repeat this process for the square in the top right, dragging the square to the left. This creates a “fade out” at the end of the music track.

Now, your final tutorial should have music that fades up to full volume, then fades below your counting in order from 1-10. Next, the music should come back to full volume after you finish counting, then fade out at the end.

Once you have finished this audio tutorial, export the file by going to File->Export->Multitrack Mixdown->Entire Track. This will create a flat .WAV or .MP3 file in the location you specified.

Tutorial 2
Editing an Interview

Now, using the tools you learned from above, download the audio track of Ira Glass  speaking about storytelling. This is a 17 minute interview where Mr. Glass talks at length about creating a compelling audio narrative. Your task is to cut this interview down to 2 minutes. You want to edit the interview so Mr. Glass gives a complete thought, that is, it should not feel like it starts abruptly or ends abruptly. Be sure to eliminate any extraneous words or phrases such as “like.” “um” or long pauses. The goal of this edit should be for it to sound smooth and unedited, but more concise and efficient in its use of time. One you have your edit to between 1:50-2:10, export the track.

Upload your tracks to Soundcloud

Create an account at soundcloud.com. Once you have logged in and verified your account, you should be able to click on the “Upload & Share” button on the top. Next click “Choose Files” and find your exported Tutorial 1. Be sure to make the file “public.” Once your file is uploaded, click on “Share” in the top left of the audio file and then click ont he “WordPress” button. You will then see a block of code that you can copy and paste into the body of your WordPress blog. Repeat this process for your exported Tutorial 2. Once you publish your blog post, you should be able to click the play button on either audio file and hear the final product, much like a “YouTube” for audio.

Please post the audio from your tutorials by 5pm on Monday, Oct. 17.

Files for class: 10/13

File One: Ascona (background music for counting)
File Two: Ira Glass Storytelling Interview (from this video), edit down to 2 minutes.